GRMP – Good Research Management Practice

Project 30 Jul 2019
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Significant investments have already been made in strengthening African research systems. However, there is an urgent need to harmonise these investments by developing a global standard for Good Research Management Practice (GRMP). This research project will develop a framework for baseline capacity assessments and processes for measuring and tracking changes in research management systems. This will enable evidence to be generated about the impact of these investments and to learn from challenges and successes to make future investments more effective.

The Centre for Capacity Research is working in collaboration with consultant Aaron Yarmoshuk and the Africa Academy of Sciences (AAS) to develop a global standard for Good Research Management Practice (GRMP). Building on the AAS’s existing Research Management Programme of Work which addresses key systemic research management issues, the GRMP will standardise, simplify and strengthen the institutional management of research.

Centre for Capacity Research Objectives
The research team is working to synthesise relevant evidence from literature searches, examining existing resources, and though stakeholder consultations and workshops. By meeting regularly with the GRMP Technical Working Group, the aim is to create a draft standard (ISO) under the project management of the British Standards Institute. In tandem, the AAS will work with the African Organisation for Standardization (ARSO) to obtain formal global recognition of the standard. The research team will also consult with funding agencies likely to use the GRMP standard to assess institutions to ensure that the proposed content meets their needs.

About Aaron Yarmoshuk

Consultant

Appointment

  • Lecturer (Adjunct), Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Canada 

Aaron is a Freelance Consultant based in Toronto, Canada.  He works with the Centre for Capacity Research on projects supporting research capacity strengthening of institutions in sub-Saharan Africa countries.  He brings over 20 years of experience to his work, including as the Programme Manager of the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) and Director of the HIV/AIDS Initiative-Africa at the University of Toronto.  He has worked in over 10 countries in Africa, including Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, Nigeria and Tanzania.  Aaron earned his PhD in Public Health from the University of the Western Cape (South Africa), MSc from the London School of Economics and Political Science (United Kingdom) and BA (Honours) from Dalhousie University (Canada).

Aaron’s research focuses on the science of capacity strengthening with a particular emphasis on institutions in sub-Saharan Africa.  He supports organisations with identifying, developing and monitoring and evaluating projects and programmes in the areas of capacity strengthening, community development, public health and higher education internationalisation.

Recent publications: 

Reciprocity in international interuniversity global health partnerships.  Yarmoshuk, AN, Cole, DC, Mwangu, M, Guantai, AN & Zarowsky, C.  (2019).  Higher Education.  DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-019-00416-1.

The international partner universities of East African HPPs: who are they, why do they do it and what do they value?  Yarmoshuk, AN, Cole, DC, Mwangu, M, Guantai, AN, & Zarowsky, C. (2019).  Globalization and Health, 15(1), 37, DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s12992-019-0477-7.

What Makes International Global Health University Partnerships Higher-Value? An Examination of Partnership Types and Activities Favoured at Four East African Universities. Yarmoshuk AN, Guantai AN, Mwangu M, Cole DC, Zarowsky C. (2018).  Annals of Global Health. 84 (1):139–50. DOI:http://doi.org/10.29024/aogh.20.

Mapping International University Partnerships Identified by East African Universities as Strengthening Their Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health Programs.  Yarmoshuk, A. N. Guantai, A. N., Mwangu, M., Cole, D. C., & Zarowsky, C. (2016). Annals of Global Health, 82(5), 665-677.e662, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aogh.2016.07.006.